(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "A complete method for the American reed organ"

mm 






uJBh 



smsmsmmm 



HI 



BBHHiw jKHK/WWflWgMfia flBflilftiiiH 

JMIHi 

HHHiml 

WKHBm 
1 wHHNi 

BHi 

HHHi 

H^RHHhwBHe'nbwrMbmH 

^HHIBii 
IHliKI 

WBIfiHjH 

UMIp 
HnlHiHi 

HP 

MmgmMmL 

■L 




IB; 



11 

alii 

wm 



w 



fiBmSie 

TOM 



rfr 



eM> 



8o4o.*n 




Given By 
Fat ate of Lydia C. Champney 



"3l 



3* 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/completemethodfoOOarch 



A COMPLETE METHOD 



FOR 



THE AMERICAN REED ORGAN. 



BY 



FREDERIC ARCHER. 



PART I. — A full description of the Instrument, and a series of 
illustrative Exercises and Pieces of gradually increasing difficulty, 
interspersed with explanatory remarks, and directions for their 
most perfect execution 

PART II. — A collection of sacred and secular compositions, spe- 
cially arranged for j;he Churqh or Parlor Organ, with or without 
pedals. 



New York: G. SCHIRMER, 



Copyright 1889. 



BURR PKINTINCi HOUSE, l8 JACOB STREET, NEW YORK. 



££WO.&H 



— . — — 





t/Lcjgs 




^a-A^ 



U 



^^{rt^r*n 



CONTENTS. 



TECHNICAL INFORMATION. 



Section Page 

I. The prototypes of the Cabinet Organ i 

II. The "Reed" I 

III. The " Striking Reed " I 

IV. "Free" Reeds i 

V. Different modes of wind-supply characterizing the Har- 
monium and American Organ I 

VI. The Bellows and their management I 

VII. Organ "touch" 2 

VIII. Training the fingers 2 

IX. Ordinary methods of acquiring the legato style 2 

X. Use of Piano music censured 2 

XI. Compass of the Keyboards 2 

XII. Description of the Keyboards 2 

XIII. The "Swell" attachment 2 

XIV. The Pedal "Clavier" 2 

XV. "Sounding" Stops 3 



Section Page 

XVI. " Mechanical " Stops 3 

XVII. "Forte" Stops 3 

XVIII. " Full Organ " attachment 3 

XIX. The "Vox Humana" mechanism 3 

XX. The "Expression" Stop 3 

XXI. Stop "Pitch," and the method of designating it 3 

XXII. List of stops in general use 4 

XXIII. Hints for preliminary guidance at the Keyboard, etc.. 5 

XXIV. "Glissando," use of thumb on white keys 8 

XXV. The modern " Free " school of Organ playing 14 

XXVI. Treatment of Chants and Chorals 15 

XXVII. Advantage of a Pedal Clavier 36 

XXVIII. Description of the Pedals and the method of 

operating them 36 

XXIX. Pedal obligate) 39 



PRACTICAL DEPARTMENT. 



No. Page 

1-3. Scales in Single Notes 6 

4-6. Scales in Thirds 6 

7-8. "Syncopations" 7 

9. Five Finger Exercises 8 

10. " Extensions" 8 

1 1-12. Exercises in Two Parts 8 

13-15. Three Parts 9 

16-17. " Four Parts 10 

18. Legato Extended Chords in Two Parts for right hand... 11 

19. " Three Parts " "... 11 

20-24. Glissando thumb on white keys 12 

25-26. Special method of fingering 3rds and 4ths 13 

27-28. Legato Octave passages 14 

29-30. Combination of legato and staccato 14 

3 1 . Single Chant 15 

32-34. Double Chants 16 

35. Chorale R. Redhead ... 17 

36. Chorale Dr. Dykes 17 

37. "Rockingham" Dr. Miller 17 

38. "Adeste Fideles " J. Reading 18 

39. "Leipzig" Mendelssohn 18 

40. " Processional Hymn " A. S. Sullivan 19 

41. Andante con moto Lefebure-Wely 19 



No. Page 

42. Priere I. Mourlay 20 

43. Duo (" Cosi fan tutti ") Mozart 21 

44. Pastorale Lefebure-Wely 22 

45. Andante Moderato Gluck 23 

46. Volkslied Mendelssohn 24 

47. " The Wandering Savoyard " Merkel 24 

48. " Berceuse " O. Schweizer 25 

49. Air Pompadour Lefebure-W61y 26 

50. Pensee Fugitive " 27 

51. Offertoire J. L. Battman 2S 

52. Les Pifferari Gounod 29 

53. Aria (" Rinaldo ") Handel 31 

54. Irish Melody 32 

55. March R. Schumann 33 

56. Extract from " Guillaume Tell " Rossini 34 

57- "Jagerlied" Van Eyken 35 

58-79. Pedal Exercises 3 6 

80-83. Two Part Exercises for Left Hand and Pedal 39 

84. Three Part " " " 40 

85. Four Part " " " 40 

86. Andante (with pedal obligato) Rheinberger 40 

87. Andante Haydn. 41 

88. March (Eli) Costa 42 



PREFACE. 



In preparing this course of instruction for the American Reed Organ, I have endeavored to 
present, in an intelligible form, every marked characteristic of the instrument, and to give full 
directions as to its proper manipulation. This has involved the insertion of much important 
matter, that has been entirely overlooked by other writers. 

It will be found that the purely technical exercises are comparatively few in number ; but 
if these be thoroughly mastered, and the principles they illustrate clearly understood, the student 
will soon realize the advantage of being able to apply them in a more extended field. In other 
words, he will be spared the labor of wading through a long series of uninteresting and super- 
fluous productions, devoid of musical interest. The only real method of musical education is 
to develop the artistic instinct simultaneously with the physical powers. 

FREDERIC ARCHER. 



New York, January, 1889 



VI. 

Introduction. 

Althoug-h this little work is chiefly intended for the use of those who are acquainted 
with the Rudiments of Music, and have some practical knowledge of the Pianoforte key- 
board, the following: concise information respecting- elementary matters is introduced with 
the view of meeting- the requirements of all classes of students. 



Staff or Stave. 



Treble or G clef 
placed on the 2 d line. 



3* 



Bass or F clef 
placed on the 4 th line. 



On the 5 lines 
E,G, B, D, F. 



Notes on the Treble Staff. 



9 * * * I » " 



In the 4 spaces 
F, A, C, E. 



Below the staff. 
D. 



I 



Above the staff. 
G. 



On the 3 ledger lines 
C, A, F. 



Below the 3 ledg-er lines 
B, G, E. 



On the 4 

alto lines 

A, C, E, G. 



On the 5 lines rBf; 
G, B, D, F, A. E±= 



Notes on the Bass Staff. 



Above the 4 

alto lines 

B, D, F, A. 



In the 4 spaces 
A, C, E, G. 



Below the staff -^r 



Above the staff 
B. 



On the 3 alto lines Hfl£ 
C, E, G. EE 



Above the 3 alto lines 
D, F, A. 



On the 4 
ledger lines 
E, C, A, F. 



Below the 3 

ledg-er lines 

D, B, G. 



5777 



VII. 



EXERCISES on the names of the Treble and Bass Notes. 



= g J I I m J 



m 



■v j i r j [ \ * [ j \ <> \ * j [ \ r j r w ! J r r J p 



3=f 



» r r i r f r , r f r f , f f=i 


^z: — — | i 1 — l — 

J.« _. _. J. __. J. _. V- 

i, r^i'rr r ri Jr rifrj f-rj rjr P ifi 


1?— ? 1 ----d J I * : --^ «- L — Ti- 1 



^-^J^ 



i=f 



f^rf 3 



The above must be studied until it can be read in 1% minutes. 

* 



The o shows the C's — the three notes preceding- each CareG,A,B, and the three 
following- the C, are D, E, F, as it now stands, or upside down. 
The dotted line shows the Clef note in either case. 



i 



ff^ 



m 



J2L 



-m-P- 



ig 



>7?7 



VIII. 



Notes O 
Rests 



J J J) J 



- - t 



represent sound. 
f f resent sUenoe. 



Semibreve. 



Minim. 



Crotchet. 



Quaver. 



Semiquaver. 



Demisemi- 
quaver. 



Hemidemi- 
semiquaver. 



r 
r 



One 



whole 




is equal to 



» » i) 



- - « H V 



" W V 



» 5) M 



»> » V 



rrr 

rrr 





r 



- is equal to 



H » « 



- - » » 3' 



« v « 



- » » 5) 



o 



rr 



•rp 



i 



r p p 



p 



One dot placed after a note, or rest, length- 
ens it one half, two dots lengthen it three 

quarters. 



5777 



TIME 



Alia Breve. 



IX. 



TABLE 



of the different Species of Times. 



COMMON. 



TRIPLE. 



Simple Common. 



w 
> 
» 



» nj 






o 

u 

o 

g 

3 



3 
to M 

it 



Compound Common. 



Simple Triple. 

of cd 



Q 

Q 
O 



«j a 






0) 

3 
C 



Compound Triple. 



0. or 2. C. or 4 



6. 



3. 



9. 



12. 



f 



2 


3 


4 


6 


2 


3 


4 


6 


9 


2 


3 


4 


6 


9 


12 


2 


2 


2 


2 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 


8 



f 



? 



The upper figure, shows the number of parts, or counts, in a measure. 

The under figure, shows the value of those parts. 

When the number of counts in the measure is less than six, it is called simple; when it is 
six, or more, it is called compound. 



5777 



X. 



Order of the Sharps and Flats to form the Signatures 



Sharps. . 




» i 


2 


3 


4 


5 


6 


7 










F. C. 


G. D. 


A. 


E. B. 










7 6 


5 4 


3 


2 1 


-s= 


Flats. 




* 


Sig-nat 


ures of all the 


Major 


Scales. 






* 






* 


• 






* 


cjPl>l> 


D 


Eb 


E 


F 


Fjt Gb 


G 


Ab 


A 


Bb 


B cb 


n 5\> 


4 


3> 


4| 


lb 


6# Q\? 


i» 


4b 


3# 


sb 


5j t\> 



* Shows the- Enharmonic changes of the Scale. 



Relative Minor Keys, to all the Majors, with their leading- notes, 



Major Key notes. 



Relative Minor 
Key notes. 

Leading notes of the 
Minor Keys. 

Signature of the Major 
and Relative Minor Keys. 



c 


G 


D 


A 


E 


B 


n 


ctt 


cb 


Gb 


Db 


Ab 


Eb 


Bb 


F 


A 


E 


B 


n 


c# 


G# 


D# 


Alt 


Ab 


z\> 


Bb 


F 


C 


G 


D 


G» 


D# 


A* 


E* 


m 


Fx 


C* 


G* 


d| 


A 


A^ 


■"1 


B^ 


F# 


c# 




'ft 


4 


4 


4 


4 


4 


'# 


7\> 


eb 


5b 


4b 


3b 


ab 


lb 



5777 



THE AMERICAN REED ORGAN. 



Until recent years the Piano Forte held undisputed supremacy as the household instrument ; 
now, however, the extended recognition accorded the American Reed or Cabinet Organ in the 
home-circle elevates it to a position of almost equal importance. 

I. Although this instrument in its present form is a modern invention, the value of " free 
reeds" as tone-producers was well known to the Chinese from the earliest times. Their use in con- 
nection with the modern keyboard dates from the Seraphine, which was introduced in England at 
the beginning of the present century as a diminutive substitute for the Pipe Organ. This was, how- 
ever, speedily superseded by the French Harmonium, the construction of which has gradually been 
brought to a state of high perfection ; and now, in the hands of a competent performer, proves an 
effective Concert instrument, although its tonal capacity is necessarily limited. 

II. In order to understand the essential difference between the American and French Reed 
organ, it is necessary to be acquainted with the nature of a reed and the method of operating it. 

A "Reed" consists of a thin strip of brass firmly fixed at one end of an aperture in which 
it is placed, and in which it is caused to vibrate by a current of air. These vibrations produce 
musical sounds, which vary in character and pitch with the dimensions of the Reed. Reeds are 
frequently termed " tongues." 

III. In the Pipe Organ, reeds are introduced sparingly, and are, with few exceptions, of the 
" beating " or " striking " species. For they are somewhat larger than the apertures against the sides 
of which they " beat " or " strike." The elasticity of the compressed air which excites them produces 
a rapidly-intermittent action, which forms i a continuous tone. The power of this tone is greatly 
increased by the resonant pipes. 

IV. The " free reed," on the contrary, is of such a size that it will freely pass through 
the aperture wherein it vibrates, instead of " striking " against its sides. 

V. In the Harmonium the air is directed against the under surface of the reed, which is 
forced outwards ; but in the American Reed Organ the wind does not pass through the aperture, 
but by the use of an " exhaust " bellows the reed is drawn inwards, by suction. 

VI. The attention of the student must first be directed to the proper management of the 
Bellows. These are set in motion by means of two treadles placed conveniently within reach of 
the feet. The heels should be firmly placed on the lower ends of each respectively, and the upward 
and downward motion of the feet when operating the levers, solely controlled by the ankle joint. 
The treadles are to be pressed downwards alternately, and to their fullest extent ; care being taken 
that the downward motion of either one begins with the upward motion of the other. The observ- 
ance of this rule is imperative, or an unpleasant, jerky effect, caused by unsteadiness of the wind- 



supply, will result. The frequency of the strokes must be increased in proportion to the number of 
stops employed, and the fullness of the chords to be sustained. More wind is required for deep 
notes, than for the high ones, as the reeds are larger. 

VII. Church Organists will experience no difficulty in manipulating the keyboard, as the 
" touch " is of precisely similar character (although neither so deep nor so heavy), as that characterizing 
its more important prototype, the Pipe Organ. Pianists, however, will find that owing to the absence 
of that after-vibration, peculiar to their instruments (in which the tone is produced from stretched 
wires struck with " hammers,") each note ceases to sound immediately the finger releases the key. It 
will also be discovered that the force with which the keys are struck does not in any way affect 
the power of tone ; for this depends upon the number of stops employed, and the degree of wind 
pressure, which is regulated by the action of the feet. 

VIII. It therefore becomes at once evident that the muscular action of the fingers must be 
developed, and wrist action, as a general rule, abandoned. A sustained legato style is the desid- 
eratum, except when it is desired to produce special effects by the combination of legato and staccato. 

IX. In order to attain the necessary smoothness and continuity, change of finger must be 
freely employed on a key while it is held down ; as well as other devices, such as passing the 
longer fingers over the shorter ones, sliding the thumb, etc. When performing music of a slow and 
sustained character, notes common to one or more consecutive chords should be retained, and not 
struck again ; unless they occur in the melody or in a syncopated or other passage in which the 
preservation of a distinct rhythm or well-defined articulation is necessary. Even here, however, it 
is not always desirable to reiterate all the notes of a chord. 

X. The student is warned to avoid the use of Piano Forte music, unless it is properly 
arranged for the Reed Organ, until he is thoroughly conversant with the nature of this instrument 
and able to make the necessary modifications himself. Unfortunately, the pieces contained in nearly 
all Instruction Books for the Reed Organ, and described as "specially arranged" for it, are as a 
rule, miscellaneous specimens of favorite themes copied, note for note, from Piano Forte music. 

XL Some American Cabinet Organs are constructed with an "F" scale, and others have the 



orthodox "C" scale. The compass of the former extends from F \E_^=^£3/ t0 ^ V Ny — 3 / 

:=" f * 

(5 octaves); and of the latter from C \ f& z j =: J to C \ p(|^: =— q ) (5 octaves). 



XII. Instruments of ordinary size have only one keyboard; but others of greater dimensions 
are now frequently constructed, which have two keyboards ; the upper one being provided with soft 
stops to be used for accompaniment to a solo executed on the lower manual ; or to produce con- 
trasted effects of tone in extended passages for both hands. A third keyboard is sometimes added- 

XIII. A mechanical "Swell" for producing effects of crescendo and diminuendo, (as in 
the Church organ,) is also frequently found, the action of which is controlled by a vertical lever 
operated by the right knee. 

XIV. The introduction of a Pedal keyboard in instruments of the " C " compass is gaining 
general acceptance. This, of course, necessitates the use of an ordinary bellows-handle, and the services 
of an assistant ; although the treadles are also inserted for use when the pedal board is removed. For 
it is so constructed as to be readily detached and re-adjusted. The compass of the Pedal board is 



from C 



:=): 



: to F - 



== H (two octaves and a fourth). 



XV. The tonal resources of the instrument are rendered available to the performer by means 
of stops which occupy a position immediately above the keyboard. They are arranged in single 
or double horizontal rows, according to their number; and are of two kinds, "Sounding" and 
" Mechanical " stops. Those of the former class, located to the left of the performer, affect the various 
sets of reeds allotted to the lower portion of the keyboard ; and those to the right, affect similarly 
the upper division. When one of them is drawn forward, the particular set of reeds it controls will 
" speak " when the corresponding notes are pressed down. When it is pushed back again, the wind 
is cut off, and the reeds are consequently deprived of " speech." All these American organ stops may 
be technically described as " half stops " as they are not of full compass. Hence it is necessary to 
draw two of them to make the entire keyboard available for use. In " C" instruments the bass 






stops generally extend upward to E \ F^ 1), and the treble stops begin at F ( F JtF 1 ^— ^1 ) • 

In "F" instruments the bass stops are usually carried upwards only to B y pc£ ~ —J ) > the treble 



stops starting with C ( p fc — = ) = H J- Certain solo stops, such as "Harp Eolian," "Musette," " Voix 

Celestes," may have a compass of three octaves. These methods of division enable the player to 
produce many effects on one keyboard, that would otherwise be impossible. For instance — by the 
use of a soft bass stop, all the notes below the " break " (F) are available for the accompaniment 
to a solo played on a treble stop of more powerful tone, so long as the melody does not descend 
below the aforesaid " F." (See Exercise 31. B.) For ordinary purposes, a treble and bass stop of 
the same character must be selected, that the entire scale of the instrument may be uniform in 
power and quality. For such correspondencies see XXII. 

XVI. The Couplers, of all the mechanical stops, are the most important. These operate 
contrivances which connect two keyboards in such a manner, that a note pressed down on one will 
be automatically depressed on the other. With some Couplers a note either an octave higher or 
lower will speak simultaneously with the one pressed down on the same manual. By the use of 
appropriate "Couplers" the effect of the instrument is very greatly enhanced. 

XVII. The "forte" stops raise the light, wooden shades that cover the reeds, and constitute 
a portion of the " Swell " mechanism. They " lock the Swell open," to quote the colloquial language 
of Organists. 

XVIII. The stop labelled "Full Organ" opens all the valves, and thus admits wind to 
all the reeds, without moving any of the stop knobs. This mechanism is also placed under the 
control of a "knee-pedal" located to the left of the performer. 

XIX. The "Vox Humana," when drawn, sets in motion a rotating " fan," placed immediately 
above one of the rows of reeds. Its use produces a pleasant, undulating effect, caused by variations 
in the degree of air-pressure which excites the reeds. (See V.) 

XX. The " Expression " stop, when drawn, opens a direct communication between the bellows 
("feeders") and the reeds; so that the wind, instead of accumulating in the "Chest," to be 
supplied to the reeds with uniform regularity, acts immediately upon them, as the bow of a 
violinist attacks the strings. Every shade of dynamic expression can be produced by its use, when 
the student has obtained complete control of the bellows. He should not use this stop, until he 
is well qualified to treat the instrument in the ordinary manner. 

XXI. The sounding stops in the Reed Organ (as in the Pipe Organ) are of varied pitch, 
and described as of 16, 8, 4, or 2 feet tone. The unison, or 8 feet tone, should predominate in each 
manual. This method of indication is illogical here, (as it refers to the actual length of the 
speaking portion of an open Organ pipe, necessary to produce " C," the lowest note of the 
Violoncello.) It is adopted, being generally understood in Europe and America. 



In order to make this immediately intelligible to the student, the actual sound obtained 
from middle C of the keyboard by stops of varied pitch is given below: 



Unison, or 8 feet pitch, .... 
which corresponds with that of the Piano Forte. 



:m 



c -<©- 



1 6 feet pitch, 



S 



-5) — : 



4 feet pitch, 



^ — : 



:t: 



2 feet pitch, 



4=i 



It will now be apparent that increase of power and variety of tone are produced not only 
by the reduplication of the actual note, but also by the use of other notes, speaking the octave 
above or below. The unison, or 8 feet, is the normal manual pitch. 

XXII. Stop nomenclature varies considerably with different makers. The exact quality of 
tone peculiar to each stop must therefore be ascertained by personal examination. The position 
of the "break" must also be found by experiment. The following stops will generally prove 
complementary to each other, in the formation of a uniform scale throughout the entire compass 
of the instrument. 



MANUAL STOPS. 



Bass Stops. 

(Left of Player.) 

8 feet pitch. 



Diapason. 
Dulciana. 
Bassoon. 
English Horn. 
Basset Horn. 



1 6 feet pitch. 



Contra Bass. 
Sub Bass. 



Treble Stops. 

(Right of Player.) 

8 feet pitch. 



Melodia. 

Claribella. 

Oboe. 

Saxophone. 

Gamba. 

Dulcet. 

Trumpet. 

Voix Celeste (Solo Stop). 



1 6 feet pitch. 



Clarionet. 

Bourdon. 

Corno. 

Musette (Solo Stop). 



— 5 — 
MANUAL STOPS— Continued. 



Bass Stops. 

(Left of Player.) 

4 feet pitch. 


Treble Stops. 

(Right of Player.) 

4 feet pitch. 


Viola. 

Viola Dolce. 
Clarion. 


Flute. 

Flute Dolce. 
Piccolo. 


2 feet pitch. 


2 feet pitch. 


Harp Eolian. (Solo Stop), formed of a double 
set of reeds, two to each note, one of which 
is tuned slightly sharp, so as to produce a 
" vibrato " effect. 


Wald Flute. 
Piccolo. 



1 6 feet pitch. 



Bourdon. 
Bourdon Dolce. 
Sub Bass. 



PEDAL STOPS. 



8 feet pitch. 



Violoncello. 
Flute. 



XXIII. The Student must first of all act in accordance with the following precepts: 
{a) The wrists are to be slightly elevated, that the tips of the fingers may be brought 

well under the palm of the hand. 

(U) No wrist action is allowed, but each note must be pushed down by pressure of the 

fingers alone. They should appear to glide over the keyboard. 

(c) The fingering marked must certainly be used. When substituting one finger for another, 
the utmost caution is necessary to prevent the key from rising. 

(d) In passing from note to note, the key of the first must be released promptly as the 
next is reached ; or a blurred effect will be produced. 

(e) The motion of parts (i. e., the progression of the voices) must be clearly indicated, 
and a perfect legato be preserved, in the absence of special directions to the contrary. 

(/) The Organ Seat (the top of which should slope forwards) must be of sufficient height 
to allow the player's elbows to be slightly above the level of the lower row of keys. 

(g) The management of the bellows demands primary attention. A chord should be held 
down for several seconds with one hand, and afterwards with both hands, while the beginner 
endeavors to supply wind with sufficient steadiness to prevent the changing of the pressure from 
one foot to the other being observed; so as to secure an unbroken and evenly-sustained volume 
of sound. 



iV.B. Draw two corresponding: 8 feet stops, which will suffice for all Exercises, etc., to N9 39 inclusive- 

except K9 3, - D and E. Scales- single notes. 



1. 



2 12 

4 34 



^ 


3 

1 


43 
21 


33 tf/W 8/ 


fe. 










4 

2 




34 -J4 
12 fj> 














3 


^ 
















1 






i 








/L f* 


















f-± 


r > 


A 






i 








ws 1 > 












•3 


t} 




K 




e> < 






l 














rt ^ 










fj r j 


o 








i$ 


L <*> 
I 








? T 




f 3 r 






i> 


+$■ 


41* 




i 


r- 


\^ ^ 
















\ J * 








/• f* 


•h 


f 


i 
























i> 


r\ 




7 \ i 


r-. 


c/ 
































<\ 










l ' 



















is simile, 



21 21 



In the keys of G, D, Et> and Ep, the thumb is not used on the black keys, 

21 21 



i 



M 



21 



2 1 



3 



2 1 2 IS 12 1 



12 



£ 



-& 



^9 



331 



-©- 



27 



2, 



zz 



«- 



£ 



*■ P- 



G- 



=3= 



TT 



s» 






-»- 



to: 



-o- 



-2 1- 



J5 1- 



2 12 12 1 



21 21 



When two or more black keys follow consecutively in an ascending scale, the right hand thumb is used, 
except on the last and in a descending; scale on the first black key only. For the left hand the process 
is reversed. 



** 



1 21 2, 1, 21 21 2 1 



UL 



2 12 12 % 



12 



Pee 



-G- 



¥=P 



-9- 



4=& 



£ 



Z2 



-e- 



3. 



& 



ZL 



i 



a. 



£ 



-&- 



IE 



ie 



-<v 



ii o a 



P3 



f5^ 



-£V- 



XE 



-42 1- 



21 2 



-4 2- 



1 2T~ 21 



12 12 12 



Scales in Thirds. 



_4 2JL 



43 

If etc. 



i 



34 34 etc. 
12 12 



E 



« 



£E3 



2 



f3 



^ 



=8F 



#-» 



^T 



gg B p 



g=g 



ii 



ft-£ 



* 



£=& 



s 



=£ 



IE 



12 
34 



12 pic 

34 etc. 



3 »1 21 etc. 

43 43 



5777 



The same method of fingering; on the black keys is observed as in scales of single notes. 



43 
21 



43 43 

* l! 



43 ~? 
31 21 



— 4 
43 i 

3 



34 34 
2 12 



34 34 
12 i 



E 



E 



34 
3 



34 
12 



fee 



fc 



^ 



£^ 



-<5 



=2=^ 



:& 



XT 



5. 



*-£ 



£ 



£-& 



fc=g 



^ 



s 



^&=g 



^ 



1£ 



12 
34 



12 1 

34 34 



2 12 

34 34 



1 3 
34 3 



* 21 
43 43 



2 1 
43 43 



21 
43 



21 

43 




A 



43 
21 



43 43 
3 1 



43 4~3 %* \ 

21 21 



ft 



^ 



V 



*£=£ 



84 3 ^ 

* 12 



34 
12 



34 



34 
2 



E 



E 



^= 



34 
12 



s 



5 — < fr 



=£ 



^ 



93fe 



5^ 



E=t 



£-£- 



# 



£ * 



£* 



XE 



5 i^ ^1 3 13 T - ~ 3 J 3 I 21 3 1 
4 34 34 34 34 34 34 3 43 43 43 43 4; 



43 



^ 



S 



31 3 
43 4 



Syncopations. 

The precise moment of changing the fingers is indicated in this Example 



'. 3 4 3 4, 

T- 1 ! ' 1 t 



w 



p-r — m 



3 A -8 



3 4_3 



4 34 



& 



I 



*± 



J. 



34 






4 ? 45 45 



i^ 



3 4 3 4 

4 5, 4 5 



£fej 



IE 



E 



31 



<f O 



P 



' 2 <l 9,1. 



1 31 






T 



7. 



31 



*J 31 



13 



1 — 31 



3 1_3 



f 2 (9 



XE 



S 



t9- 



XE 



v 5 



4 34 34 etc 



3 3 43 43 43 



i 



£ 



XE 



5 
XE 



IE 



4 

n 



~rr 



za: 



-3- 
XE 



ZEE 



£ 



8. 



** 



31 



3 1 



21 



2 1 



3 1 



2 1 



5S 



fe 



£E 



**- 



s 



fl- 



3 



- 3 3 



5777 



8 

Exercise 9 is designed to promote the independence of the fingers,and increase their elasticity. The sus- 
tained notes in each hand must be kept firmly pressed down, and those assigned to the remaining fingers 
played perfectly /egato, and with the utmost distinctness. 



m 



5 4 



w 



'£ l i l 

.; J j J 



Era 



»t=jb 



r r r r 

3 4 1, 3 

J J J J 



TTTf 



I4 I3 l« Is 



XT 



3, 4 



9. 



^h 



4, 3 



3 , 1, 






a^ 



m 



4 • 4 



3X 



B m 



Tf^ 



±=d 



*=? 



XT 



tr 



LUJ 






i^E^ 



_t* — a 




N.B. Carefully observe syncopation and retention of notes common to consecutive 
chords. In bars 3,4,5, the third finger is firmly held on the F sharp, while 
the 5th and thumb rise and fall alternately on D and A. 



N^ 



fes 



1— J- 



Fffi 



J— i 



r 



^ 



^ 



§E§ 



-e- 






~^>- 



^^ 



-O- 



-©- 



H3- 



Extensions, 



9 * 
A 1 



31 31 

_3 a 



21 

51 



31 
3 

zz 



31 
3 

Q- 



13 
4 



13 
3 

(9- 



12 
15 



13 
3 



* 



zz 



? 



^9 



ZZ 



10. 



g?f^F 



§ 



■(9- 



•»- 



^ 



^ 



Z± 



^ 



ZZ 



~cr 



3 &~ 
13 |» 



13 



-<9- 
3 
13 



A 5 

B 2 



3 
13 



12 



3 
31 



21 



3 

21 



3 
21 



Exercises in Two Parts, 

(involving "extensions and contractions.") 



3 1 



1 £ 



^tf 



E 



<9 3 



# 



13 



fczz 



1 5 

1 O 



i 



XE 



XE 



£ 



ZZ 



-o- 



11. 



5777 



*£ 



» * 



£ 



*£ 



§8 



^j p 



J L 



^3 — 3 1- 



-tf> 



-3 1- 



4- 

4 



Z7 



1 3 



3 



K « 



9 



12. 



» 



s em pre /egafo. 



^ 



^— # 



2 5 



S 



i 



e 



i 



S 



s 



5 2 1 3 1 3 



8 12 



1 2 i 



3 1 3 4 5 » 3 



^ 



S 



^ 



yj r T^ 



P— i 



^^ 



I 



£3 



■ m 



n 



9 * 



3»l3 8 4 * 8 • * 8 * 



1 3 



3 13 1 



13.- 



Exercises in Three Parts, 

(or voices, as bass, middle and upper parts.) 



n & 


s 




4 


53 S 


4 


5 4 




33 
1 


•4 
3 






5 




4 






y B 
























/L t* - — 






^ 














l> 


c\ 


r?h * <* f< 


V 




o 


«J 


^ 






V 




n f J 


(° « j. 


Y 1/ *-* 


ZJ 


itj 


o 




O 


rj 


r ^ 


^ w ■ m 


3 


1 


o 

31 


1 




f—\ 


tl 


3 


' \ 


1, 


1, 








~. 


4\. ,i' 
















IN 


•#• i /* 
















rj 


„/ 




S T I; 




C\ 


« 


'!!« 














*"» 


I* 


















K 










U 


5 3 




i' 


i 








3 




1 








It often proves convenient to pass the shorter fingers under the longer ones, and vice versu, aswW. be 
seen on reference to the following Exercise. 






5 i 4 3 



5, 4 5 



43 



i 



5, 4 



3 



3 4 5 4 



J I 



2± 



^5^- 



^=^=^ 



=? 



^2 



■51 



^ 



14. 



it r 






~7^Si 



¥¥=¥: 



33 



3£ 



-ii_ 



iia. 



£ 



(9- 



©■ 



Q. 



-# *- 



^ 



Hl 



5777 



10 



15. 



^ 






31 



IE 



E± 



£ 



55 



fife 



xs: 



£ 



3, i 2. 



t 



i 



4 34 



25 



P 



i' 



xx 



^Tff 



^=# 



I 



r> 



1— 



zz 



-*> 



X5I 



4 53 



* 1 



3 4 5 



TV 



43 



Exercises in Four Parts 



45 
3- 



3 



£ 



i 



^3 



Sfc 



W 



-&- 



Zf^L 



^ 



§3 



z 



S 



^ 






<^e- 



-©- 



-**- 



Xf 

i 



XT 



16- 



2li 
l 



■&■ 



3 



xs: 



331 



r; i y ; 



E 



-o- 



-o- 



*— i- 



£ 



45 



45 4 



& 



ist 



&- 



<9 S 



¥? 



fit 



^ 



-©- 



17. 



8, 



XT 



g *tt «' 1 



J4 



14- 



XX 

"lS 



1 



^ 



te 



«t 



^ 



-e- 



a 



190- 



n 



xx 



21. 
3 4 



2 
34 __4 



12 

34 34 



4 5 4 
SI S 







52 



feM 



-e- 



-«- 



-6>- 



f 



^TfT 



?=?* 



2 1 8. 



S 



^M 



s i s , 



3 2, 



A^U 



l 



s 
xt 



-»- 



1^ 



-©- 



43 
1 



5 4 34 5 



4 

3 S, 



54 5 
Si 



5 5 4 34 



9 * 



zEM: 



+-w 



JSL 









XT 



XT" 



X5T 






1- 
43 



«*- 



J. 



1 

5 



s: 



H 



-€*- 



Ir- 



1_ 3 
S3 4 



f 



XX 



xx 

12 
5 



~34~ 



^ 



^ 



5777 



11 



In playing a series of legato chords variously located, change of finger must constantly be resorted 
to, in order that all "notes in common"may be properly retained. In effecting this, intervening fingers 
must also be used when necessary, involving more than one change on a single note. 

When a new chord is formed by dropping a note of its immediate predecessor, it is simply necessary to 
raise the fingers assigned to it. None of the notes should be struck again, when the chord assumes its altered shape. 



% 



45 
12 



24 
1- 



43 
1- 



I 



42 
21 



5 45 
» 12 

•r #■ 



f? 



24 3 4 3 



B B j 



i 



?=e 



i=¥« 



18. 



i 



^ 



pi 



s 



XE 



-©- 



-O- 



5- 5 4 

* I 1 21 ^l *» 



32 
21 



53 
21 

0U 



45 
12 



5- 
.12 



XE 



-»- 



m 



t 



XE 



d- 



XE 



zz 



fcfe 



p 



54 
42 
21 



* 



5_ 
3_ 
12 



85 
24 
12 



45 
23 
1- 



I? 

1_ 



54 
32 
21 



5 
4 

2 



45 
24 
12 



I 



4 

2 



* 



I 



19.- 



s 



f 



54 
32 
1- 



53 
42 
21 

P 






I 



5- 
43 
2_ 



:^E 



45 45 

34 23 
12 12 



34 
2- 
1. 



f^ 



5 
2 

# 



s 



323 



5777 



12 

The glissando use of the Thumb. 

The sliding of the thumb from a Llack key to an adjacent white one, is a device perfectly familiar 
to all pianists and organists. It is not so generally known, however, that by the employment of a 
modified glissmido process, the thumb can also be similarly utilized on consecutive white keys, with 
entirely satisfactory results. 

Although it is difficult to. clearly explain the operation without practical demonstration, the following 
description will, it is hoped, enable the intelligent student to understand the matter sufficiently to mas- 
ter this important manipulative detail. 

Ey a depression of the wrist, the upper joint of the right hand thumb is lowered until it rests against 
the front edge of the key. Then, using it as a fulcrum, the tip is raised and by a forward movementpoised 
on the surface on the next key below. Then the thumb is suddenly straightened, and the point pressed down- 
ward on the second key. This movement also at the same moment releases the upper key. 

With patient practice the necessary suppleness of joint will speedily be developed, and it will be 
found that a lenghtened series of adjacent white keys in a descending scale can be played by the right 
hand thumb alone, without the slightest lack of continuity being perceptible to the ear. Ascending notes 
can be operated by the left hand thumb in a similar manner. 

The value of this expedient, especially in dealing with complicated harmonic progressions, cannot be 
over-estimated, as it enables the player to dispense with many changes of fingering. 

Carefully practise the following, until they can be played fluently and rapidly. 



20. 



Right Hand. 




P^ 



1 



5 



21. 



Right Hand. 



5 



45 4j 



51 



etc. 



S 



Left Hand. 



mm 

45 etc. 



■e- 



XE 



j~/T~ 



zz 



nrr 



-e- 



■G- 



45 




± 



I 



sfc 



^=^ 



45 



^ 



JZ. 



22 



XE 



! 



zzz 



Q==^ 



r 



-o- 



-o- 



3E 



£: 



23. 



S 



l K\ 



J 



ICE 



f 



-O- 



-©- 



1 



-G- 



5777 



13 



BE* 



24.< 



=S 



l L. 



ZZZLE 



1 



P¥ 



P 



2 



-o- 



1 

5 
■<» 

r 



The method of fingering indicated in Exercises 25 and 26 , not only serves to render change of finger 
less frequently necessary, but tends to "educate" the hand, and increase its resources. In rapid passages 
of double notes it will be found specially useful. 



4 
8 



i 



f 



25.- 



5 



23=F=Z=Z 



i=l 



j^fs* 



i 



5 
1 



i 



M 



¥ 



f 



t 



h^ 



77 



4 5 4 



^j=J=p 



- 4 5 
5 « 1 



5 4 



4 
2 



PP 



$=* 



5 4 ° o 1 o , 

a l £ -m- m l 

t . »f f ,^4 



S^Ef 



26/ 



KiP? 



Efc* 



E4^ 



E2 



^S 



E33 



« 4t *- 



"5 5 4 



"3 IT - a 
4 5| 



4 5 4 



5 4 5 



8 

4 



2 5 4 



4 5 

1 



f^EEf 



S5 



1 1 1 



4 



flfej P 



■# 






ft 



jl=* 



m 



m 



3 

4 



ft 



2; 

8 

4 



5777 



14 



Octave Passages. 



In the performance of octaves in regular succession, the utility of the gfissando thumb at once be- 
comes evident. When they proceed by skip, the lower notes of the left hand, and the upper notes 
of the right must be played feg'afojthe unavoidable want of smoothness in the inner parts will thus 
be rendered less observable. 



4 



54 



54 etc. 



£— £ 



£ 



I 



i 



SlSL 



27. 



* nr 



m 



i 



$=d 



£ 



+g 



t 



45 
3 5 



P 



45 etc. 
43 



5 

ML 



43 



5 



43 



45 

XL 



fee 



-e- 



TT~ 



28. 



m 



4=^ 



i 

34 



m 



-o- 



53 



5 



45 



43 



53 



5 



(XXV.) The modern style of Organ playing-. 

The so-called "strict style" of organ playing, Calthough obstinately adhered to by those pedants who 
imagine that absence of artistic sensibility is atoned for by more mechanical accuracy and slavish ad - 
herence to tentative scholastic formulae,) is being gradually superseded by a "mixed style," in which 
modern French methods are conspicuous 

The development of this mixed or "free style "of playing, has already exercised a most beneficial 
influence on the Art; It has not only rendered intelligible phrasing possible, but also revealed char- 
acteristics hitherto unknown. 

All the "effects" dependent on the "touch" can be obtained from the Cabinet organ, and the student 
will, therefore, do well to become practically acquainted with the combined use of legato and staccato 
with the same hand, as an indispensable preparation for the acquirement of this style. 

The observance of the rule relating to "notes in commonfsee (IX), may be necessary in one part and 
unnecessary in another, as will be apparent in the following exercises. The exact observance ofrests 
is also a matter demanding the closest attention. 




5777 



15 





ggj f jg r i 



COTO Chants and Chorales. 

In playing Chants and Chorales, the old, "strict style," is rigidly maintained, although some licences in 
the matter of fingering are permissible. Five methods of performing a chant are here given; each 
of which produces a markedly different effect. 

A. The Chant is presented in condensed vocal score. The exact manner in which it is rendered on the 
Cabinet Organ as far as the retention of notes is concerned, etc., is exemplified at B. Two 8 feet stops 
of corresponding tone should be drawn. The use of a Treble Solo stop of 8 feet, which extends 
downward to F, and a soft Bass stop of 8 feet which extends upward to E, will produce an entirely 
different result, when the Chant is played in a similar manner. 

C. The melody is played in single notes on a Solo stop, and the remaining parts are assigned to the left 
hand using a soft bass stop of 4 feet . 

D. Played as written with all the stops drawn, or the "Full Organ," knee-pedal pressed outward. 

E. Bass in octaves, the full power of the instrument again being employed. Cn those instruments 
in which the 16 feet stops predominate, the right hand part should here be played an octave higher. The 
student is recommended to select Chants and Chorales, and treat them in a similar manner. 

TO?. When the position of the notes renders it impossible to employ the thumb g'ttssantfo,care must be 
exercised in order to use it on two consecutive notes in such a manner, as to prevent any perceptible 
"break" in the flow of the inner parts. (See Exercises 27,28.) 

Single Chants. 




i 



ur 



& 



* o 






T 



m 



■o- 






X> 



dot 






=£ 



J 



xs: 



5777 



16 



B 



*a 



4 5 4_ 
1^ 3 



- nk 4 - 5 4 5 4 

33 5 *5/83 3 3 3 

1_ 1 IS'!- 3 1, 1 



n 



(Solo stops, 8 or 16 feet J 



££ 



S 



351 



ZEE 



^T 



5 



zz: 



^9 



331 



:& 



^ 



-» 



HE 



-©- 



T 



XT 



1 3 



x»- 



r 

A 1 i>~. 



1 



' * >-^« y- 



», l 



-»- 



Kv 



/?.#. 



^J- 



M 



(Yiola 4 feet.) 
ll 1 



i 



3X 



31 



3X 



m 



»~XT 



pa • , 



a gg 



XT 



XE 



$»a gjg 



1 



ff 



oo " ! > — (5 



1 45 



ft ftXo 



5 



5 



-»- 



32 



Full Organ. 



*s 



I 4 



s 



33_ 



33 



5 45 , 

— ,f p 






i 



*£ 



fe^ 



Full Organ . 
5, 45 



© 



45 

34 



331 



ffi 



2=^ 



X»- 



351 



-e- 



& 



351 



12 



^==^3 



=& 



fF 



IX 



V : Yti^ *q> 



^ 



K*- 



£1 



,£Z 



o 



*? 



f 



o 



J5L 



W 



XE 



XE 



W* 51 



3X 



XE 



XE 



XE 



3X 



^ 



»3-«- 



<9 



-e- -e- 



■»- 



Double Chants. 

(Harmonies in the right hand.) 



-45- 



45 41 



BE 



XE 



+5 



5 



7Ti~ 



^ 



^W 



m 



^PE=£ 



XE 



^ 



Wf 



ff 



-**- 



f 



-e- 



XE 



32. 



^^ 



-€*• 



-©- 



(2- 



i 



331 



ZZ 



= 



-e- 



jt^ 



fiZ2 



-e- 



5 



-»- 



331 



331 



33" 



i 



(Harmonies divided between both hands. 

43 



± 



it 



-#*- 



>3 4 



^=Fff 



aa 



331 



-^- 



^ 



331 



¥ 



z£* 



fr 



^$ 



^^ 



331 






^ 



4^ 



*v 



r 



-«v 



-e^ 



€>0 



33. 



m 



31 






1 



XE 






3 

13 *| 

M 



i 

33_ 



Z2j 



1 



M 



e=F- 



i 



& 



s 



33: 



XE 



XE 



3X 



^ 



^3- 



^> " .' 



-O- 



-e- 



(Harmonies partly between the hands, and partly in the right hand.) 



$ 



5 4 



^ 



i 



53 



£ 




& 



x>- 



-*v 



331 
331 



g 



-*V 



34. 



3X 



PP^ 



rr 

i 



-«- 



-«- 



331 



31 



i^XS 



aa: 



i 



3X 



z:^: 



Sx 






^ 



i>Q 



■« 






#*2 



^L 



ZZ 



xr 



XX 



^*- 



5777 



CHORALES. 
"Litany." 



17 



R. REDHEAD. 




$ 



6 6 



Wa 



S 



^ 



£=^ 



•r r 



^ 



^ 



XE 



-O- 



^ 



XE 



xe 



XT 



^ 



FT 



f 



^ 



-1 



IT 



A3 



-*4- 



o 



XE 



43- 



36. 



"Nearer my God to Thee." 

5 5 4 4 



Rev. Dr. DYKES, (d. 1880.) 

I 4, 5| 4 



£=5* 




^» 



4 5 



^ 



^ 



S 



34 
4 1» 



b± 






-«3- 



fff 



zi=i 



xr 



XE< 

»i 






<S43i 



T 



^ 



4^ 

XT. 



^|J^ 



W- 



r 



a 



id; 



i£y 



;?.#. 



§ 



55? 



XE 



ffi 



f 



P 



-3#- 



v I Q. 



-e-r- 



f 



ax 



«3- # 



$=H 



23 

4 1- 



"Rockingrham." 



Dr. MILLER.(d.l807) 



-34 «- 



4 3 



-O- 



XE 



s=~ 



7^9 



351 



f 



r 



* 



F 



wen?" 



XE 



-43- 



f 



r^ 



XT 



37. 



'nnr^ 



i R>H. 



r 



* 



j^ 



XE 



-O- 



-43- 



-4»- 



<S- 



-w — © 



£ 



p 



£ 



XE 






XE 



*•> 



53 



5 



i 



34 



XE 



XE 



U 



XE 



43 r 



'2 1 



Hfc^ 



XT 



X4_ 



f f I * f 



fff 



s 



§=& 



-43 <9 



J- 



■»- 



43- 






OCT 



44 



r ■ fUf r ' f 



-43- 



2= -44 



XE 



~n~ 



5777 



18 



ADESTE FIDELES. 



JOHN READING. (d. 1740.) 



U 



£ 



H=^ 



4, 5 



t 



4 5 



3 



5 4°, 



^ 



i=e 



r?H 



5^ 



* 



f 



^_,» « 



-o^ 



I s . 



r=r 



--1 



38 



f- 



9fe 



X 

* 



^ 



1 



u 



-*# 



i 



i 



f 



x*_ 



*=£ 



E 



*=£ 



1 



^ 



f 



-*s- 



3 24 



***- 









i 



**3=j 



^ 



£ 




m 



^ 



rff 






t 



<& 



p^ 



i 



U 



13 

LA 



1 4 ' l 



i 



:j 



S 



j 



iji^ 



f 



m 



i 



±sbfe± 



i 



^ 



4 

3 - 

li 5 



I 



at 



rf=* 



^ 



*— ^ 



^z 



-y 



^> — # 



-o- 






^- 



5^ 



J-"~«l j 



J J J J 



}± 



j2_ 



«L 



^ 



ZEE 






f 



* 



-3o- 



4 3 5 



CHORALE. 



MENDELSSOHN. 



1 



d 



a 



» — e 



1 



E 11221 



hfb 



^ Eg 



^9 



rf 



-»- 






r 



F 



¥ 



T 



1^ 



**v 



39. 



, J 



^^= 



s 



£ 



tr 



i 



^ 



# 



«r 



-Gh 



# 



^ 



S 




2 



=s 



ffr 




Pf 



n 



r 



rr 



■o^ 



3 



a 



3X 



2 1 



^ 



ff 



i 



S 



-<9 



^9 



T 



5777 



Onward Christian Soldiers. 



t ^ ti 






n 



^ 



iO-3 



19 
A. S. SULLIVAN. 

4, 5, 






351 



s 



13* 



-^- 



r 



r=r 



-e- 



40.- 



Full Orpn ,/ 



^ 



4* 



g 



# 



0-0-0- 



j-iy 



IDl 



^ 



4^- 



3=33! 



^ 



-O- 



XE 



5 3 




i 



5, 4 3 



PP3 



1 



5 3 
4_3 
S_l 



i^ 



? 



i 



35 



4 i 5, , 3, 



-/?*- 



9 J 



331 



2 I 



xe 



S 







^»- 



O: » 



§ 



£ 



o- 



_ti_ 



■e- 



* 



V 



12 



i^ 



r 



'frf 



^ 



>> r r r r " r ' r ' "r'r 



XSI 






A Selection of pieces of varied character and gradually increasing difficulty is here given, to illustrate 
the methods of procedure explained above. Corresponding Treble and Bass Stops of 8 feet pitch, 
(such as Melodia and Diapason,) should be used as before, in the absence of special directions. 



ANDANTE CON MOTO. 



LEFEBUREWELY. 



$ 



33 



^^ 



5 45 a 



O 



2 



m 



^ 



m 



4 5 



i 



34 43 



zz: 



-G- 



¥s 



' J \>r j 



zs 



w 



£ 



e 



^ 



-*3- 



r 



IK 



41. 



S 



-e>- 



-©- 



4^- 



-»- 



-e- 



-o- 



-o- 



3 



~0- 



-©- 



*V 



^ 



**- 



-e- 



**- 



-«a- 



f^ 



5_ 

3, ! 



5, 4. 



i 



14 



3 



^ 



^ 



«Ufc 



li 



P 



2EE 



£L 



-e — 



^ 



■a 4- 



-bo- 



ra//. 



i 



ee 



*> 



-e- 



-«a- 



& 



-»- 



^ 



«*- 



J. 



4^- 



zz: 






-«:»- 



XE 
: 4a = 



XE 






5777 



20 



PRIERE. 



Andante. 



mm£ 



f 3 
Z 



L. MOURLAN. 




i 



m 



3 4 i 12_ 
1 3 



i 



f 



^ 



f 



f 



42.- 



§3 



» >:tt B 



S 



*» 



^ 



S§ 



I 



3 



■& 



#-*- 



^3: 



tf 




i 



% 



i 



P 




* 



^ 



r- a 



? 



&? 



^g 



f 



^ 



2 



^ 



g 



5 



s 



^ 



S 



f ; 



i 



-#- 



^-=- 



=^ 



4, 3 



m 



i 



m 



4, ^3 



$ 



£ 



^ 



^ 



«fc 



f 



* 



f 



^* 



™//. 



^1 



fet 



77 



"#— *♦ 



fi 



5 3 

3 




i 



P 



, 4 « 



5 

12 4 



i 



f 



^^ 



^ 



* 



f 



f 



m 



m 



* 



-<9- 



m 



W 



i 



w 



^» 



p 



^ 



e^ 





S 






t* i 



** 



Efe 



5777 



DUO and CHORUS 
"Cosi fantutte." 



21 



Andante. 



i tV g n] 



s 



42 
21 



M 



34 5 
1- 3 




# 



MOZART. 
2 a * 



^g 



? 



F^ 



43. 



2> 



^ 



E^ 



54 5 5 45 4 



XS 



o- s 



3 

w 



i 



i 



p 




e 



2=P: 




12 



112 11 



i * a. r m 



*=§£ 



*4 



£ 



^ 



± 



\ i * tf 



5 45 « 



(add 4 feet stops.) 



45 



M 



m 



s 



45 5 




^ 



? 




?TB 



~H 



f 5 



>". 



•/ 



P 



S 



5 



3 4 5 4 (add 4 feet stops.) 




5777 



22 



PASTORALE 



LEFEBURE WELY. 





±M 



T 




Full Organ. (Knee Pedal.) 



LMJ J J I J 







(R.P.off.) 



(K. P. off.) 





J 



^u 



^ 



£M 



$ 



~ zi e\ 



£ 



£ 



Z£Z 



* 



r 



p 



SH 



tS- 



9=^ 



S^ 




5777 



ANDANTE MODERATO. 

1st time, 8 feet. 

21 d time, Full Organ. Knee Pedal. 



23 



GLUCK. 



i 



± 



4, 34 35 



P 



I 



± 



3 



E 



-tV: 



r 



-tv 



ff 



rprf 



j> 



r r-?T 



4 



45. 



/ 



■»- 



r 



r 



j-J^S^ 




XE 



^ 



s 



p£ 



£V 



mt 



m 



w 



v 



r=r 



(K.P.off.) 




JJU 



* 



J. 






^ 






"FT 



^ 



»/ 



i 



* 



J_i 



ii 



S 



S 



¥^¥ 



f 



fe ; J J 






i 



**=» 



4- 



31 1-3 



^ 



fw 




4- 



(K.P.on.) 



f? 



/ 



S 






*v. 



-»- 



i 



« 



J ^J J 



-8 — * 



F^ 



-? 



■~f r f* *r 



f~r r r 



¥ 



^r 



J^ 



#p3 



P 



i 



w 



i 



i 



^^ 



^ 



a- i 






r~% 



iu 






P=f 



f 



r 



-i-j 






**■ 



1 



ri—m 



W 



^r 



ffi^ 



? 



£ 



27ZE 



r 

When the rhythmic construction demands the repetition of a note, it should be reiterated, even if it 
occurs in the inner parts, as for instance D,D, in the first bar of NV46. In this piece,both hands must be 
raised momentarily where the asterisk * is placed, to mark the phrasing-, and indicate the points where 
a vocalist would take breath, were the melody sung. Clearness of phrasing and articulation must al - 
ways be considered. 



5777 



24 



VOLKSLIED, 



The necessary tonal contrasts can only be 
produced by the use of the "Expression' stop. 



MENDELSSOHN. 



^ 



mk 



^ 



*p 



sa 



SP 



m 




?$F** 



frffn 



f 



FHT 



46. 



Ill 



f 



p^ 



^s 



^ 



*=» 



e 



^l 



pp 



n 



P 



p 



^ 



rrr 



ff 



i 



5 



a 



dim. 



S 



M 



» w.v 



i-*fp r 



IS 



ffff 



p 



pff 



* 



s 






i 




Si 



4fr 



— e- 



f 



« 



^ 



f^f 



f¥^ 



» 



fr F 



^r 



n 



r 



r- 



"The Wandering Savoyard." 



G.MERKEL. 



Moderato. 






E 



ii_!_ 



f 



#— & 



zz 



f 



47. 



i» 



cresc. 



Pff^ 



&* ? 



/: 



dim. 



ee± 



ta 



^, 



3 



*-fr^ 



rj* 



j 



** 



i 



1. >Q J J 



i 



^ 



jb~a 



f 



j 



^ 



g i "r r * 






cresc. 



u 



t=s 



1 



J 



^-^ 



i 





? 






/ 



^^ 



Sp 



^P 



5777 



H 



*jap 



25 



4 % J J r 



_0_ 



22: 



rf 



*Z$g5 



^^ 






f 



aat 



(Change to Viola 4 feet.) 



s: 



z£ 



or esc. 



iz. 



f 



i 



(Change to 8 feet.) 



5 



e^ee£ 



^ 



j^T^S? 




* K t i if_f 



BERCEUSE. 



Con tenerezza. 



0. SCHWEIZER. 



i 



^ 



^ 



i=3 



^ 



«u-j- 



i 



SI 



r^ 



Uf 



+—*■ 



r 



f=*p 



48. 



3E 



m^a^^ 



e 




^ 



f=f 



BET 




S 



^ 



feS 



i=^ 






f 3 
Mi 






f 



^B* 






i 



^-JWhh-j> 



P 



1 



^ 



^ 



£ 



f 



^=T 



I 



S 



J3 



i=^ 



</ />« . 



^ 



■IMI* 












I 



r 



£ 



^h J4j)j j> 



r 



r 



r 



5777 



26 



AIR POMPADOUR. 



Allegro moderate 



I 



¥ 



49 



V 
p 



m 



ESPP=P= 



1 



^zt 



4 



LEFEBIKE WELY 



* 




m 



? 



i- 



£ 



jy^y 



:±Jt 



S 



j2." 
* s p 



£ 




^ 



^ 



5 




Ml 



i 



^ 



y-r-y- 



#* 



«* a t s 



£ 



^ 



iD 



T 



If 1 * 



i 



J: 






ace el. 



e crese. 



-A i 



eljlu 



rag 



^ 



*gE 



E 



i 



^ 



i 



i— i Jr"^ 



£ 



£ 



£ 



m 







1. 



5- 



f 



Jtn 



. ) y ? *• 



p 



ss 



^a 



? 




I 



9 f " y 



t * J = 



^ 



^ 



a T # 



K 



*=£=* 




Pp 



fe 



1 — f 



V 



2=E 



r 



dim. 



f=f 



m 



-& 



p y • y 



1 



-? 



p 






i9- 



5777 



PENSEE FUGITIVE. 



Andante. 



27 



LEFEBUREWELY. 



K 



u 



m 



7 
V 



¥ 



ytf 2 y[ , r 



»♦ # 



f 



p 



^l^J^ 



f 



f==? 



^a 



JTjP 



^ 



2* 



9 



^ 



r 




^ 



C^ u ' 



M 



£±4 



b 



4 > Ji t : 



j tt * ^ * 



333 



t 



J± 



f 






*} 



WW 



f — r 



a . ..r 



& 











> 



1 



tune 



P 



p~y 



I 



3 



p { y 



^3 



23; 



* 



F 



■33- 



mp^ 



ras 



J jg jj i 



fe*i 



Wrn 



Kto 



1* 9 ? 



t 



7 0-0 



J 1 ) I 



^' W 



^-h? rr r^ 











Jr 



•J? 



vr rrr 



*5 



CCCI 



p^ffi^ 



pgEfe 



2 



4* 



8 J» 5: 



¥ 



m 



-s^# 



^ 



« 



j-jjjj 



^ 



^ 



2Z 






r 






^Zf F 



r 



r 



f 



rt 






^ 



pS 



^ 



£ 



^ 



P^ 



Full Or^an.(Knee Pedal J 



y 5 j o 



S 



& 



i y ;r ; 



iC\ 



t* — £ 



m 






tar 



r 






9mj*~F 



Bii3 



i 



± 



s 



g y 5 



23E 



S 



s 



_&_• 






f 



5777 



28 



NP 51 to 57 inclusive, are intended to illustrate other usual modes of Registration. 



(Treble .)Melodia <fe Oboe(8feet.) OFFERTOIRE. 

Prepare. (Bass .) viola (4 feet.) 



Allegro 



5, 2 



(K. P. off.) 



J. L.BATTMAN. 

CK.P.on.) 



22 



S 



^g 



t^ 



225 



-G- 



51. 



/ 



p 



f 



^ 



^ 



2:^5* 



325 



^ 



# 



■£* 



■«>■• 



(K.P. off.) 



(K. P. on.) 




i 



^ 



i 



5 



B 



^ 



Z 



S 



77T 



f 



F 



F 



r 



5^ 



■zn 



^ 



^ 



22 



zzz 



g 



T^ 



^_: 



-fiM- 



5 



45 




5777 



29 



s- 



V s 



22: 



±± 



22 



tt 



f 5 



s 



Z32I 



J i d: 1^ tiH^H-Tf 




^ 



-«-* 



5- 




" LES PIFFERARI." 



p _ (Treble.) Oboe, (8 feet), ;tnd Piccolo, (2 feet). 

1 p ' (Bass.) Diapason (8 feet). "Expre ssion " Stoi 



GOUNOD. 



u 



ra 



I 



£ 



£ 



a 



s 



JnL/T*. 



** 



a * 



52. 



a 4 



^ 



lb 



*- 



simile. 

I U 



m 



■X 



2 



^e 



I 



u 



B 



S^p 



£ 



s 



^ 



eeSeje 



£ 



att 



• / » 



gggj 



SL 



i 



1*-5" 






£ 



1 



^ 



l^ #g 



■; 



^ 



^ 



^ft 



^ 



i 



■X 



f^=¥-. 



Al 



X 






5777 



30 






w~P 



?£$ 



JT^/J* 




, J | » ^ 



=*=* 




y^ 



rt 



i 



a 



*^ 



%gi 



Jr 




J>« **^ 



^ 



J rfy 



• « • • 



m 




i 



#i- 



(Piccolo in.^ 




*#s 



^P 



^^ 



m T 



^^ 



ff^ 



^^ 



-G-*- 



dim. 





FF 



Jl 



3 



1 



±=£ 



SEE;< 



^* 




5777 



#1 



AIFURinaldo.) 



(Treble.) Clarinet or Cor no, (16 feet,) and Melodia (8 feet. 
Fre P are (Bass.) Viola, (4 feet.) 

Largo. 



HANDEL. 



& 



■ m 



m* 



m 



0Z 



t i B 



P 



pp 



53. 



yT'i S S g 

4- /?_ 



I 



±-±4 



i 



^3 



S 




g ■>" I * # g - 1 «m: 



Full Org-an. (R.P.) 



$ 



* fr ,V 



a^ 



i 



^ 



§§^i 



p 



P? 



*• j) 



t5L 



5^ 



f 



m 



<f 



m J g I 



ii 



i 



i — J* 3 



-^ 



f 



=£ 



f 



n* 



* 



f^j J i n ^ P 



(K. P. off.; 



F^P 



-(9- 



e 



?^£ 



f 



s*n; 



9 



j i 



J. 



£j£ 



*y=^ 



4 



f 



f 



# — 9 — t 



<B 



£^« 




£ 



iff if 



•-^ 



a^n 



^ 



p 



pp 



-r-t 



erese. 



r\ 



^M — ^ 



i*^ 



i 



S 



n 



FTB F ^lFT? 



s 



^ 



■p> 



£7Y 



s 



V 



5777 



33 



IRISH MELODY. 



(Treble) Melodia and Oboe, (8 feet.) 
Prepare. ( Bass ) D lap a son, (8 feet.) 



Largo. 



i \ 1 1 



«3t£ 



■^J^Jl 



p-r* .rr, r ^ 



& 



*•- 



P» _ P ' ^=g 



f 




U^f^ i 



S - y ^_^ |*\ y 



54. 



jP 



OT^ 



^ 



f 






v : b i g 



?z: 



mes 



PZ3K 



add Musette (16 feet.) 



*' m * 



& 



J Th J. h J- 



^^ 



I<t* 






«/* agita fo. 



n 



f i a_J-~ 



S 



p— y 



^U 



i> 



l i r p q 



#=p= 



n» — . 3 — 3 » 




^ 



Mij r-J I p 




(Musetti- in.) 



P^P: 



^ 



J- J J 7 g 



P I „ • % * 



» ' 7 



F 



3 



^ rn^ 



cre.se. 






4 



u± 



A 



LU 



^ 



g i rr 



^? 



-fed. 







c\ 



u &mt 



SEES 



9 m' • 



H 



rp 



331 



* 



i> 




^rr 






fi.ff. 



^=H 



-& 



g 



rTf^fcTp 



y- 



ffi 



31 



^T3 — 3=» 



iy 



5777 



33 



MARCH 



p (Treble.) Melodia, (8 feet),and Flute(4 feet.) 

prepare. ( Bass> ) Diapason (8 feet.) 



Maestoso. 

Full Organ. (Knee Pedal.) 



SCHUMANN. 



f 



^^ 



nJ n 



FffT 



m 






rr=f 



r 



55. 



J 



i 



i 



un 



s 



TT 



^^ 



S 



r L/r lt 



f 



i 



5± 



^a^ 



^ 



i^§ 






^ 



■ 



f 



(9- 



Pf 



5r 



r *:j 



F 



g tf 



PP 







i=S 



ia 



# # 



r 



# » 



r 



r 



f 



mil 



^m 



Change to Cor no (16 feet J 



^n 



^m 



ii 



M: 



3 



£ 



IE 



(K.P.off.) 



$ J JT3^J= 



Ht 



s^ 



3i 



I f r r 



Change to Contra Bass. (16 feet.) 



r 



(K. P. on.) 



S^ 



Ftp 



^abi: 



P3 



-LO^ 



^ • J^- l 



®eS 



iei 



ff 



F 



¥ 



#= 



ir 



•/ 



r 



s^i 



4 



r^f* 




I 



P- 



*=5 



Si 



5777 



34 



Extract from" GUI LLAUME TELL." 



Pr P ™rP (TreWe ^ Melodia (8 f^t.) 
riepare./ B;(SS , Diapason(8 feet. 



i pa son (I 

JV. B. Stop changes must be made precisely when indicated, in order to produce the desired effect. 

ROSSINI. 
Allegretto. 



w w 



5 



m 



m 



m. 



m 



Change to 



fe 



w^) 



*=f 



4 



+t? 



bjL-V 



0-0^0^-0 



56. 



W. \\ I 



^^ 



f ME 



*■» 



I 



/ 



M 



t^ 



m 



£ 



000 



ECI 



SE 



B^ 



P 



s^=3t 



p 



M-# 



f 



Corno. (16 feet.) 



* y j jP,J Jy -J^ 



m 



g. p. 



Change to 



NP^ 



S 



fe 



-*<-»-» 



^ 



£ 



£ 



^ 



i 



j> 



s 



*:£* 



l£S 



Change to Diapason. 



|LJL 



S 



— 



-| — Oct 



^ 



m 



& 



£» 



* ' «> «t 



Change to Contra Bass (16 feet.) 



Melodia. 



a i y j]] 



ffi 



S3 



Change to Corno . 



IP 



Hi 



I I li jEjC=P 



« 



jE=* 



i 



^ 



s 



# 



^ 



#^# 



rr 



rr 



dim. 



it •»» 



m 



i 



3*FP 



s 



l^% 



Change to Contra Bass. 




X 



h 



i^ 



5 



i 



^ 



^ 



•-•■ 






* 



f^ 



« 



* * ' - * * 



rr 



-0-0 



■ I I jj 0~$~ 



* 



i 



^ 



^v 



5 



^ 



^^ 



Pffl* 






+ t*T 



I 



Change to Diapason. 



tt=±* ±* 



7 1 T^ lg: 



e 



e= 



*=* 



' 



±jh 



Jd: 



Change to Corno. 



0*000 



IE 



^ 



S 



s 



w 






£ 



3 



5=2: 



-fit- 



-©- 



» 



Change to Melodia. 

ff 



§ 



5777 



JAGERLIED. 



35 



„ (Treble.) 8 feet. 

Prepare. (Bass.) 8 feet. 



rfdbl 



Allegro moderato. 

Full Organ. (K.P. on.) 



BE 



M 



i=k 



(K. P. off.) 



P 



i=^ 



G.J. van EYKEN. 

(add 4 feet.) 



f 



rm* 



± 



r 



a — .u. 






57. 



/ 



i 



g i ■ 



S^F? 



PP? 



! 



f^r 



(add 4 ft.) 



O- 



Se^HS 



^m 



(K.P. on.} 



J^ 



ftfc^ 



(K.P. off )8 feet in 



d=^ 



f^ff 



n * r 



f=*=ff 



7 






Lit y gjj 



sag fr\ » ??m 



i 



^ 



•/ 



J=^ 



i 



i^ 



y | s r 



^r^ 



(8 ft.ia) 



(add 8 feet.) 



»/ 6 3 \Q 



pp 



i-^i- 



$ 



$ 



1 



¥ 



a — # 



f=f=jE 



fe£j 



jj i j j 



f 



rr 



w 



J i l 



^n 



a. 



33l 



IE 



\ ^ ~ t 



y 






(K.P. on.) 

i 



(add 8 feet.) 



(K.P. off.) r, f (K.P. on.) 



i 



4 



S j i ' ^ 



(K. P. off.) 



s 



^ 






^fFT 



a — i: 






*-* sr - * 



i*t r r 



i 



i> 



si 



# ■#- 



§§i 



« — * 



¥ *" 



9 » ^ 



fet 




i 



A (K.P. on.) 



E=£ 



^ 



El 



f'i't r 






e* 



r 



r 



r^r 



si 



^ 



a 



/v///. 



r 



■ * 



K 



5777 



36. 



(XXVII.) 



The Pedal Clavier and its Management. 



This important adjunct of the instrument adds very greatly to the players resources. It enables 
him to distribute chords o rche strally, and to employ the left hand more freely in the attainment 
of desired effects. 

If the Organ possesses two Manuals, many effects can be produced that would be impossible in 
the absence of a pedal-board For instance, a melody can be performed by the right hand on the lower 
key-board, while the accompaniment is played with the left hand on the upper,(or Swell Manual), the 
bass being assigned to the pedals. Many other devices are also practicable. 

The pedal part is usually placed on a separate staff, in the case of important Organ Works; but 
music written in the ordinary manner can be rendered additionally effective, by doubling the lowest 
notes written in the unison or the octave below, (according to circumstances) with the pedals, when 
rests do not appear below these lowest notes. 

(XXVIII) 

On examination it will be seen that the general arrangement of the Pedal keys is similar to that 
adopted for the Manual Claviers . 

The shorter keys are arranged in alternate groups of two and three, but the distance between Bb and 
Clj: Etj and F{j is greater than in the case of the other long keys. 

The proper compass of the pedal-board is from CC to F (two octaves and a fourth), and its normal 
pitch 16 feet. 

It is provided with independent stops of both 16 and 8 feet pitch, which practically extend the compass 
of the instrument one octave lower. 

As a general rule it will be found desirable to couple either the upper or lower key-board to the pedals. 

The Organist should be sufficiently high to permit the feet to touch a long pedal key on the slightest 
depression of the heel or toe. 

The pedals must never be struck, but pressed steadily and firmly down. 

In practising the following Exercises, a coupler should be used, which will enable the student to see 
by a glance at the manual key-board, if the notes played on the pedal-are correct. For he must never look 
down at the feet. This is a habit that must be carefully avoided. As it is preferable, however, to rely on 
the ear and not the eye for guidance, even this expedient must be abandoned so soon as moderate famil- 
iarity with the use of the pedal- board has been acquired. 

The method of pedalling is indicated by two signs a, signifying the toe, and v, the heel. 

If it is intended that the right foot should be used, these signs will appear above the notes-, if the 
left foot, they will be found below them. 

Draw Sub-Bass 16 feet, and couple to lower key-board. 



58.S 



331 



I 59S 



m 



XT 



I 



60.S 



A 
A y A 



A A 

A V A V 



TV 



A V A 
A 



V A V A 

V A \j A 



i" jjjf i rrr ^^i 



5777 



37 



B2. ' ): V g J j J 



33: 



VAVAVAVA 



V A Va Va^A y 



I 63. ^^^^^p 



3X 



i 



64. S 



^ — * 



* A V 

V 



V A V 



V A f 



65. H J p (! 



V A V 



A 



V A 



V A 



zz: 



19- 



3H 



-A V- 



A V A V 



* 



A V A y 



66. S 



1 



fp^f 



* m -* I g m 



f 



A V 



*^ t 



A V 



67. ^S 



A V A V A V 



A V 



i 



v 



A V' 



A 



f 



^^ 



? 



w 

A 



A V 



68. S 



V A V ' A ' V 



A \J 



XT 



r J r i r 1 r 



» A 



zz: 



■e- 

A 



69. » 



3X 



= J = W f 



It is frequently necessary to cross the feet, when the short and long keys are used in the same passage 



70. ^ b ^ J 



i 



V A V A v A 



S 



P I g P 



^P 



A V 



XT 

A 



A V 



71. S§ 



A . V 



f 



A 

-0- 



V A V 



PP 



3 



*»- 

V A 



72. ^¥tv^ 



A V 



V A 



-# *- 



\J A 



A V 



£ 



XE 

A 



5777 



38 

When both feet are used alternatehy ( crossin°:"on the white keys becomes necessary. In such cases, 

the left foot always passes behind and beneath the right, as in the following example. The toe is alone used. 



73. gj J p 



=F 



A 

-S>- 



i 



A 



^ 



** ^ 



331 






Mixed Intervals, 



74. 



v ; <-, J J r J 



^hhhN 



A V 



^=*= 



PI 



3X 



A V 



V A V A 



75. ^ rrrrV'TNirrnrfi^rr ^tf 

CP A A A I I H» A A A A 



A V 



i*=FF 



-©- 



A A 



It is very often convenient to play notes that are a third apart with the same foot, as shewn below. 
This operation presents no special difficulty. Larger intervals, however, require some care in passages 
played strictly legato. 



76.^ 



^^ 



£ 



77. ^S 



jj r i'rr 1 J ^^ 

Aj/ v A A V 



A V A 



I 



^ 



i=ri=3i 



r^ 



It is also sometimes necessary to change feet on the same key, as in the following instance. 

V 0, A , A A A 



78. S 



2—1 



33: 



*PPI 



z: 



^ 



7 



3X 



A \'A 



XT 

A 



When three short keys follow each other consecutively, the right and left sides of the same foot are 
utilized, in order to produce a perfectly legato effect, as in the next Exercise. 



79. 3fiP 



(L.side) (R. side J 

A A 



I 



~&- 



-o- 



^ 



e—ri 



22 



A 



A v A 



(L.side.) (R.side.) 



It may be remarked here, that although the left foot is more frequently employed than the right, the 
student must train both feet equally. 



5777 



39 



(XXIX.) 

Little difficulty will be experienced when the notes assigned to the pedals correspond with those 
taken by the left hand; but the execution of an obligato part requires diligent and careful practice. For 
it is not easy to acquire a thoroughly independent use of the left hand, from its general disposition to 
duplicate the action of the feet. Therefore, the following Exercises for the left hand and pedals should 
be practised. 



Left hand 



2 

49- 



V A g | 



6- 



HT 



80. 



Pedal. 



§ 



*JF 



§ 



f 



Z2 



■G 
A 



■G- 
A 



73 ,j_ jq. 

G *■ 4&. 

a 7r 



i 

-G 



m 



n. 



r i " r 



JJL 



81. 



S 



:zz 



K>- 



A 



27 

V 



A 



A 



§E|3 



*£ 



1 



frrfHl 



V m G 



ZEE 



3X 



Z2I 



I 



f 



82. 



& 



S 



-o 1 



^ 



22 



2Z_ ZZ 



-<9 



A 



»- 



-©- 



V A 



V T 'A 



V A 



^N 



* 1 



i 111 * 



5 » 4 1 



2 14 



G~ 



34 



m 



¥ 



2Z 



£ 



HE 



83. 



* ):8.l 5 



1 



A V 



i 



a v 



B 



?^— g 



3T 



22 



A V 



A •«■ 
V 



■G- 
V 



v 



■*■ Hi 



4 8 — *- 



-©- 



PP 



-£" 



ggtf 



V A 



§e 



1 



■*- 



V A 



A ,_ V 



A 



PPi 



ZEE 



6777 



40 



Trio for Manual and Pedals. 



MANUAL. 

84 



PEDAL. 



3^ 



§BEE 



m 



O- 



2 * 4 



r J 6 



2 * „ 



i 



^ 



5 3 

GL 



t 



13 



^§ 



IE 



-G- 



£ 



s 



A W A 



A 1/ 



A W A 



P*=Jf 



v I p r- 



A V 



V A 



?i J| Jr i? — a 



Exercise in Four Parts. 

(Pedal Obligate) 



I 



3 1*3 



i 



i 



I 



3, 5, 4 5 4 3 



51 



m 



4, 3 2 4 3 2 



iM 



HE 



r! 



fc* 



«=i=* 



in 



rf 



85. 



£ 



n=? 



#• = # 



XT 



rr 



£^t- 



Ps- 



s 



p 



A W 



^^ 



2± 



£ 



E If 



IE 



zz 



-fi> 



TX 



A 



! »weii. 
Great. 
Pedal 



Swell. Soft 8 feet stops. 



ANDANTE. 



Bourdon. (16 feet.) 
Gt. (Lower Key-board.) 



m 



p 



^ 



86. 



Sw. (Upper Key-board.) 



■'Mi .a TOT , , 

F — ^ — ^ — -r 



ig 



S 



s 



fe 



a 



*=<f 



£*^ 



1 

I 



RHEINBERGER. 

Sw. 



^# 



*^ 






s 



&3*3 






5777 



41 



* 




Gt. 



w 



&* 



$ 



m 



£ 



?c*= 



W^ 



S3 



s^#y 



?is 



^ 



S 



J- 






hk 



J3 
^ 



i 



j. 



i 



& 



i 



«u 



H 






i 



i 



^? 



? 



jj ' ii'j^'j- '^ y 



5K= 



§ 



¥7 



Swell, 8 feet. 
, Great, 8 feet. 

frepare.j Pedalj ief ee t. 

Swell to Coupler. 



* 



ANDANTE 



HAYDN. 



bw. 



i 



l > t J) y 



I 



fe£ 



±: 



*±=2 



I 



it 



87. 



Gt. 



S ^ J 



£e| 



PS 



M 



f ^ 



§g^ 



41* * — r> 



± 



± 



? 



£ 



Gt. 



PeS 



^ 



*=*^ 



r J> & 



» • » 



y y 



* 



« 



~<r? 



1 



tL£-i-M 



nm 



0—t* 



m 



Sw. 



iffi 



g ''It ' * 



S 



^ 



^S 



y t y 



^ 



m 




Sw. 



H£ 



fc 



Gt. 



P 



B 



*■»» 



= S 



« L d 



WEZZM 



Gt. 



§^ 



#— # 




r * 



Sw. 



f 



fT 



^ r j 



^^ 



^^7T ga 



^ 



t 



6777 



42 



_ (Manual 8 feet stops. 

pare. (Pedal 16 and 8 feet stops. 



Draw Couplers. 
T i r , ten. 



^i 



i 



MARCH 
"Eli." 



i 



z£ 



COSTA. 




3 



I _£ 



rf 



V T 



* 



M^f 



r 



^ 






88. 






fi> — * 



? 



£ 



s 



i 



i 



# 



« 



1 



^ 



CD raw 



=S£ 



J i 






o 



=^= 




■«>■ 



ri- 



rr 



•<^- 



£ 



i 



3E 



r-r 



p 



^ 



* 



? 



£ 



-o- 



f 



s 



Full Organ stops.) 



^ 



4 1 _ 



§=2 



3 



°=5 






r 



T^Tf 






rr 



rr 









4 i: r> r> 



§ 



^ 



9 9- 



7 — =n 



f 



3 



i 



f 



£^ $ & 



E=* 



-» 



« — #- 



2? — 5»" 



i 



£ 



^ 



1 



i 



* 



f=T 



^6 » 



p^ 



«< — # — *- 



: Pf^ 



rr 



TT 



19- 



3 






3E 



g rig 



tfit 



:& 



g— « 



-»- 



^ 



oj a 



^ 



p. p • 



w- 



T^f 



* 



s 



^ 



3 



^m 



^ » 



^ ■• * • ■ ^ 



-«- 



5777 



43 



I 



3=& 



S^ 



± 



A 



-«- 



¥¥ 



W=F 



-©- 



-**- 



-»- 



^F 



<5 € 



v~ 



Tf 



(Full Or?an in.) 



£- 



P 



H=g 



y 



fr «. 



£=£ 



£* 



i 



CL 



m 



m 



■&■ ■&■ 



§ 



& — 



5 



«*F 



^ 



-M 



21 



(Draw Full Org-an stops.) 



^ 



« 



«hM 



xs: 






r? 



T 



^ 



W* 



te 



TTf 



^- 



^ 



i 



si 



;g jyg 



e* 



3X 



S 



1 



^ Of 



(9- 






£ 



£Z=2 



9 9 



^ 



s 



22 



i 



^ 



^ 



^ 



-<*- 



=S= 



Pff 



IE 



^ 



g=g 



? 



TT 



*ff 



FT 



r 



rp 



fT 



S 



XT 



3T 



*f# 



E£ 



-»- 



^ 



£=±± 



g=£ 



ZL 



^ 



-O- 



^ 



v a 



3X 



9- 



m 



^ 



^ 



TT 



-O- 



Jf 



<9~ # 



**+? 



J. ' 4 W * d 



t 



3ee£ 



1A 



rs 



T! 



m 



v m 



r^ 



73 K. 



T£ 



n 



■9- 



** 



a 



*»- 



-o- 



:^=T 



*4± 



I 



& 



f> 



3JL 



_o 



*V 



/V?//. 



-_. «V 



^s: 



351 



f 



-«*- 



f 



5? 



IE 



3t 



0\ 



s 



a, V B 



.«L 'JL 



£ 



m 






ig B&j 1 3|1 J J^jJJ^rniTjTi ^ 



f«rr r T'rfr'a 



5777 



V A 

End of Part I. 



«*-. 






Boston Public Library 
Central Library, Copley Square 

Division of 
Reference and Research Services 

Music Department 



The Date Due Card in the pocket indi- 
cates the date on or before which this 
book should be returned to the Library. 

Please do not remove cards from this 
pocket. 






Boston Public Library 
Central Library, Copley Square 

Division of 
Reference and Research Services 

Music Department 



The Date Due Card in the pocket indi- 
cates the date on or before which this 
book should be returned to the Library. 

Please do not remove cards from this 
pocket. 






BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 9999 05709 5331 





ShBhSa 

Alii 

■■" 

■HH 
wM&m 

1111111 

Sin 



HHI 



■■ 



■ HHI 

■ ■■MB 

«i us 

in 

iHCfli 



■ 



mm 



SR* 



ATOS 

bsswhSh 



i 



11111 Hk 



^^H 



■ 



111111$ HP 



■■ 









an hb^h 
■■■■■■■■ 













HSBslili 

MM9HMJ1 

■■■■■■ 

■■1 ■■ I 

91 HH 

: ■■■■■■■ 
■■■■J 

Hi I 

■1 ■ I ■■■ 



■■■1 



I ' I ■ ■■■§ 

■ ■■■■■ 

■ ■ ■■■■ 

mmgm 



mmm